Sunday, May 29, 2011

Our journey begins...

Our little yurt is not so little. 24 feet in diameter, she's a one-year-old Pacific Yurt from Oregon. It has only been a week since we first saw her. Her previous owners David, Lauren, and their daughter have moved out so that we could tackle the task of moving her this weekend.
We have gathered a small 5-person crew together this weekend (Jon, his parents Dick and Kathy, our friend Greg, and myself) to disassemble and move her from NH to our home in Pownal, ME.
It took us only 3 1/2 hours to take down her structure yesterday, and the rest of the day to take apart the floor platform because the screws had been sunken in so deeply.
The side panels came off easily. Removing the roofing material layers was next.
And then the big dome skylight... which was remarkably lightweight.
Once we were down to the skeleton, we began taking off the roof rafters one-by-one.
And then we detached the lattice walls from the door frame, and voila! We were down to the platform.
We ate a delicious picnic lunch that Kathy packed for us all, and swatted away the blackflies as we sat...
And after the flooring was up, we only had the platform frame to take apart.
It was a long day, but we got most of our work done, and went home with two trucks and one trailer full of materials.
And finally we were on our way home- not with everything, but with the majority of it!
Today it took only three of us two hours to finish the work, pack up the rest of the materials, and tidy the site. We found these little fellas under the cement pilings. They found a happy new home in the moss at the edge of the meadow.
It is remarkable to see what a low impact this house has made sitting in the field.
And we were able to take down and move our entire house in a day and a half, using five people, a little determination, three drills, two trucks, and one trailer.
Not bad, I'd say.

Friday, May 20, 2011

Today we bought a yurt!

A couple weeks ago we were traveling through Northwestern Argentina, getting ready to come home, and not sure exactly what that would look like.
Since September, Jon and I have spent seven and a half months at Mama Roja, collectively, studying sustainable living principles; we felt excited about bringing those home with us to the States, but unsure of how to best do so.
But right... back to Northwestern Argentina. We were in Tafi del Valle when Jon found our future home advertised on Craigslist. We called on a choppy Skype connection, and let them know we'd be headed home later in the week. Two days after arriving home, we drove 3 1/2 hours to visit our yurt in Gilsum, NH. We knew right away that she was ours.